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Health

  • Diet
  • Nutrition
  • Exercise
  • Weight Loss
  1. High Protein Meals
  2. Walk More
  3. Resistance Training
  4. Recovery(Sleep more)
  5. Supplements

Blue Zones

  1. LESSON ONE: MOVE NATURALLY
    1. Be active without having to think about it
  2. LESSON TWO: HARA HACHI BU
    1. Painlessly cut calories by 20 percent – hara hachi bu – stop eating when 80 percent full.
  3. LESSON THREE: PLANT SLANT
    1. Avoid meat and processed foods
  4. LESSON FOUR: GRAPES OF LIFE
    1. Drink red wine (in moderation)
  5. LESSON FIVE: PURPOSE NOW
    1. Take time to see the big picture – Okinawans call it ikigai, and Nicoyans call it plan de vida, “why I wake up in the morning.”
  6. LESSON SIX: DOWNSHIFT
    1. Take time to relieve stress – socialize with friends, be early (less stress), meditate
  7. LESSON SEVEN: BELONG
    1. Participate in a spiritual community
  8. LESSON EIGHT: LOVED ONES FIRST
    1. Make family a priority – put families first
  9. LESSON NINE: RIGHT TRIBE
    1. Be surrounded by those who share Blue Zone values

Protein content

One large egg (50 g) provides 6.3 g of protein.

High Protein

1. Eggs

Whole eggs are a good source of protein that’s easy to absorb, and they’re also an excellent source of vitamins, minerals, healthy fats, and antioxidants.

Remember that egg whites are almost pure protein, but whole eggs that include the yolk provide many more nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and healthy fats.

Protein content

One large egg (50 g) provides 6.3 g of protein.

2. Almonds

Almonds are a nutritious tree nut rich in essential nutrients like fiber, vitamin E, manganese, and magnesium. They’re also high in plant-based protein.

Eating almonds may benefit your health in several ways, including lowering heart disease risk factors like high LDL (bad) cholesterol and high blood pressure.

Protein content

One ounce (28.35 g) of almonds provides 6 g of protein.

Other high protein nuts include:
Pistachios, which deliver 5.73 g per 1-ounce (28.35 g) serving.
Cashews, which contain 4.34 g of protein per 1-ounce (28.35-g) serving .

3. Chicken breast

Chicken breast is an excellent choice if you’re trying to increase your protein intake. In addition to protein, chicken provides a variety of B vitamins, plus minerals like zinc and selenium.

Protein content

One half of a chicken breast (86 g) provides 26.7 g of protein.

4. Cottage cheese

Cottage cheese is a type of cheese that is low in fat and calories yet high in protein. It’s rich in calcium, phosphorus, selenium, vitamin B12, riboflavin (vitamin B2), and various other nutrients.

Protein content

One cup (226 g) of cottage cheese provides 28 g of protein.

Other high protein cheeses include:
Cheddar cheese, which provides 3.96 g of protein per 17-g slice.
Mozzarella, which provides 6.29 g of protein per 1 ounce (28.35 g).

5. Greek yogurt

Greek yogurt, also called strained yogurt, is a very thick type of yogurt high in protein.

It has a creamy texture and is a good source of many nutrients like calcium, vitamin B12, vitamin A, selenium, and zinc.

Protein content

One 7-ounce (200-g) container provides 19.9 g.

Other yogurt products that are high in protein include:
Unsweetened low fat yogurt, which provides 11.9 g of protein per 8-ounce (227-g) container.
Kefir, which provides 9.21 g of protein per 1 cup (243 mL).

6. Milk

Dairy milk contains a little of nearly every nutrient that your body needs. It’s a good source of high quality protein, and it’s high in vitamins and minerals, like calcium, phosphorus, and riboflavin (vitamin B2).

Many people with lactose intolerance can’t tolerate milk and other dairy products, and they avoid many dairy-containing foods.

Protein content

One cup (246 mL) of dairy milk provides 8.32 g of protein.

7. Lentils

Lentils are among the richest sources of plant-based protein, making them an excellent choice if you follow a vegetarian or vegan diet.

Plus, they’re loaded with other nutrients, too, including fiber, folate, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, and manganese.

Studies show that people who regularly consume lentils and other legumes have a lower risk of developing health conditions like heart disease and fatty liver disease.

Protein content

100 g (about 1/2 cup) of cooked lentils provides 9.02 g of protein.

Other high-protein legumes include chickpeas, which provide 7.05 g of protein per 100 g cooked, and black beans, which provide 8.86 g of protein per 100 g cooked.

8. Lean beef

Lean beef is a rich source of protein. It’s also high in bioavailable iron, zinc, selenium, and vitamins B12 and B6.

Red meat can be a part of a healthy diet, but it’s best to moderate your intake. Consuming high amounts of red meat has been linked to a higher risk of developing certain health conditions, including colorectal cancer.

Try cutting back on red meat and eating plant-based protein, fish, and poultry more frequently.

Protein content

A 3-ounce (85-g) serving of lean beef provides 24.6 g of protein.